Ten Years After – “I’d Love to Change the World!”

Photo credit: www.songfacts.com

Well, here’s a band I haven’t heard in years. I am sad to say that I had forgotten about them until I heard I’d Love to Change the World on my Sirius radio a few weeks ago. I can tell you it awakened in me the feelings of the 70’s as a teenager, enjoying life, going to school, playing sports, drill team and hanging out with my friends. Not a care in the world other than making sure my chores & homework were done. I listened and started longing for those good ole days as I enjoyed drove to my destination. I have listened to this song over and over. The band has changed members and are still doing what they love.

My favorite song of theirs will always be “I’d Love to Change the World!” Back when the song was written, there were many mind blowing events going on in the world, such as there are right now. These things made many song-writers put pen to paper and start writing out their feelings regarding things that struck a nerve in many Americans!

This song was written by guitarist Alvin Lee, who was the centerpiece of the group. “I’d love to change the world, but I don’t know what to do and I’ll leave it up to you. I’m just saying the world does need changing,” he said of the song in Vintage Rock. “I’d love to do it, but I haven’t got the talent. I don’t think I’m a world changer.”

The song is a good look at what were considered the big problems in the world in 1971: overpopulation, economic inequality, pollution, war. Alvin Lee often said in later interviews that the song remained just as relevant despite the passage of time.

The first line in this song throws out a few slurs:

Every where is freaks and hairies, dykes and fairies

“Freaks” and “hairies” are terms that detractors used to describe the band – after all, they did play Woodstock. The dykes and fairies are likely a reflection on how others might see the world, and it also creates a memorable rhyme. Later in the song, Alvin Lee pulls out a rhyme of convenience in the lyrics:
Life is funny
Skies are sunny
Bees make honey
Who needs money?

Formed in Nottingham, England, Ten Years After made a huge impact when they played the Woodstock festival in 1969 – their performance of “I’m Going Home” made the film. They released two albums in 1969, two more in 1970, and one in 1971 – A Space In Time, which contains “I’d Love To Change The World.” Their albums sold well, typically charting in the Top 25 in America, which was their stronghold. Hit singles were not a concern; Alvin Lee had almost a disdain for them because he didn’t want his songs edited down and then talked over by a DJ. “I’d Love To Change The World” was by far their biggest hit and most enduring song. Their other charting songs in America were “Love Like A Man” (#98, 1970), “Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock ‘N Roll You” (#61, 1972) and “Choo Choo Mama” (#89, 1973). The group stopped performing in 1975 but regrouped every now and then. Alvin Lee died in 2013, but the band had been playing without him for about 10 years by that point.

The group was formed in 1966. They took their name because it was 10 years after what they considered the birth of rock and roll.

Alvin Lee mostly played and recorded under his own name following his split from the band. He died from complications during a routine medical procedure on 6 March 2013.

Credit – www.songfacts.com

Band Members –
Current – Chick Churchill – keyboards (1966–1974, 1983, 1988–present)

Ric Lee – drums (1966–1974, 1983, 1988–present)

Marcus Bonfanti – guitar, vocals (2014–present)

Colin Hodgkinson – bass (2014–present)
Former – Alvin Lee – guitar, vocals, harp (1966–1974, 1983, 1988–2003; Died 2013)

Leo Lyons – bass (1966–1974, 1983, 1988–2014)

Joe Gooch – guitar, vocals (2003–2014

SONG LYRICS –
Everywhere is freaks and hairies
Dykes and fairies, tell me
where is sanity
Tax the rich, feed the poor
‘Til
there are no rich no more?

I’d love to change the world
But I don’t know what to do
So I’ll
leave it up to you

Population keeps on breeding
Nation bleeding,
still more feeding economy
Life is funny,
skies are sunny
Bees make honey, who
needs money, Monopoly

I’d love to change the world
But I don’t know what to do
So I’ll
leave it up to you

World pollution, there’s no solution
Institution, electrocution
Just black and white, rich or poor
Them and us, stop the war

I’d love to change the world
But I don’t know what to do
So I’ll
leave it up to you

credit:https://www.lyrics.com

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Phillis Wheatley – Poets Who Inspire!

 

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Photo Credit: https://www.bing.com/images

This is a lady I’ve heard of before, but never read any of her writings and poetry.  I am very impressed and will definitely spend time reading about her.  She was truly a unique woman who was blessed to have people around her who cared enough to teach her to read and write and also enhance her talents and love of poetry.  Please read through her biography and take a look at the beautiful monument in her honor that stands at the Boston’s Women’s Memorial. She was truly inspiring!

Phillis Wheatley, also spelled Phyllis and Wheatly (c. 1753 – December 5, 1784) was the first African-American woman to publish a book of poetry. Born in West Africa, she was sold into slavery at the age of seven or eight and transported to North America. She was purchased by the Wheatley family of Boston, who taught her to read and write and encouraged her poetry when they saw her talent.

The publication of her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral on September 1, 1773, brought her fame both in England and the American colonies. Figures such as George Washington praised her work. During Wheatley’s visit to England with her master’s son, African-American poet Jupiter Hammon praised her work in his own poem. Wheatley was emancipated (set free) shortly after the publication of her book. She married in about 1778. Two of her children died as infants. After her husband was imprisoned for debt in 1784, Wheatley fell into poverty and died of illness, quickly followed by the death of her surviving infant son.

Early life

Phillis Wheatley’s church, Old South Meeting House

Although the date and place of her birth are not documented, scholars believe that Phillis Wheatley was born in 1753 in West Africa, most likely in present-day Gambia or Senegal. Wheatley was sold by a local chief to a visiting trader, who took her to Boston in the British colony of Massachusetts, on July 11, 1761, on a ship called The Phillis. It was owned by Timothy Fitch and captained by Peter Gwinn.

On arrival she was re-sold to the wealthy Boston merchant and tailor John Wheatley, who bought the young girl as a servant for his wife Susanna. John and Susanna Wheatley named the young girl Phillis, after the ship that had brought her to America. She was given their last name of Wheatley, as was a common custom if any surname was used for slaves.

Wheatleys’ 18-year-old daughter, Mary, first tutored Phillis in reading and writing. Their son Nathaniel also helped her. John Wheatley was known as a progressive throughout New England; his family gave Phillis an unprecedented education for an enslaved person, and for a female of any race. By the age of 12, she was reading Greek and Latin classics and difficult passages from the Bible. At the age of 14, she wrote her first poem, “To the University of Cambridge, in New England.” Recognizing her literary ability, the Wheatley family supported Phillis’s education and left the household labor to their other domestic slaves. The Wheatleys often showed off her abilities to friends and family. Strongly influenced by her studies of the works of Alexander Pope, John Milton, Homer, Horace and Virgil, Phillis began to write poetry.

Biography Credit Wikipedia :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillis_Wheatley

To A Lady on The Death of Her Husband –

GRIM monarch! see, depriv’d of vital breath,
A young physician in the dust of death:
Dost thou go on incessant to destroy,
Our griefs to double, and lay waste our joy?
Enough thou never yet wast known to say,
Though millions die, the vassals of thy sway:
Nor youth, nor science, not the ties of love,
Nor ought on earth thy flinty heart can move.
The friend, the spouse from his dire dart to save,
In vain we ask the sovereign of the grave.
Fair mourner, there see thy lov’d Leonard laid,
And o’er him spread the deep impervious shade.
Clos’d are his eyes, and heavy fetters keep
His senses bound in never-waking sleep,
Till time shall cease, till many a starry world
Shall fall from heav’n, in dire confusion hurl’d
Till nature in her final wreck shall lie,
And her last groan shall rend the azure sky:
Not, not till then his active soul shall claim
His body, a divine immortal frame.
But see the softly-stealing tears apace
Pursue each other down the mourner’s face;
But cease thy tears, bid ev’ry sigh depart,
And cast the load of anguish from thine heart:
From the cold shell of his great soul arise,
And look beyond, thou native of the skies;
There fix thy view, where fleeter than the wind
Thy Leonard mounts, and leaves the earth behind.
Thyself prepare to pass the vale of night
To join forever on the hills of light:
To thine embrace this joyful spirit moves
To thee, the partner of his earthly loves;
He welcomes thee to pleasures more refin’d,
And better suited to th’ immortal mind.

 

On Imagination – 

THY various works, imperial queen, we see,
How bright their forms! how deck’d with pomp
by thee!
Thy wond’rous acts in beauteous order stand,
And all attest how potent is thine hand.
From Helicon’s refulgent heights attend,
Ye sacred choir, and my attempts befriend:
To tell her glories with a faithful tongue,
Ye blooming graces, triumph in my song.
Now here, now there, the roving Fancy flies,
Till some lov’d object strikes her wand’ring eyes,
Whose silken fetters all the senses bind,
And soft captivity involves the mind.
Imagination! who can sing thy force?
Or who describe the swiftness of thy course?
Soaring through air to find the bright abode,
Th’ empyreal palace of the thund’ring God,
We on thy pinions can surpass the wind,
And leave the rolling universe behind:
From star to star the mental optics rove,
Measure the skies, and range the realms above.
There in one view we grasp the mighty whole,
Or with new worlds amaze th’ unbounded soul.
Though Winter frowns to Fancy’s raptur’d eyes
The fields may flourish, and gay scenes arise;
The frozen deeps may break their iron bands,
And bid their waters murmur o’er the sands.
Fair Flora may resume her fragrant reign,
And with her flow’ry riches deck the plain;
Sylvanus may diffuse his honours round,
And all the forest may with leaves be crown’d:
Show’rs may descend, and dews their gems disclose,
And nectar sparkle on the blooming rose.
Such is thy pow’r, nor are thine orders vain,
O thou the leader of the mental train:
In full perfection all thy works are wrought,
And thine the sceptre o’er the realms of thought.
Before thy throne the subject-passions bow,
Of subject-passions sov’reign ruler thou;
At thy command joy rushes on the heart,
And through the glowing veins the spirits dart.
Fancy might now her silken pinions try
To rise from earth, and sweep th’ expanse on high:
From Tithon’s bed now might Aurora rise,
Her cheeks all glowing with celestial dies,
While a pure stream of light o’erflows the skies.
The monarch of the day I might behold,
And all the mountains tipt with radiant gold,
But I reluctant leave the pleasing views,
Which Fancy dresses to delight the Muse;
Winter austere forbids me to aspire,
And northern tempests damp the rising fire;
They chill the tides of Fancy’s flowing sea,
Cease then, my song, cease the unequal lay.

 

Thoughts On The Works Of Providence – 

A R I S E, my soul, on wings enraptur’d, rise
To praise the monarch of the earth and skies,
Whose goodness and benificence appear
As round its centre moves the rolling year,
Or when the morning glows with rosy charms,
Or the sun slumbers in the ocean’s arms:
Of light divine be a rich portion lent
To guide my soul, and favour my intend.
Celestial muse, my arduous flight sustain
And raise my mind to a seraphic strain!
Ador’d for ever be the God unseen,
Which round the sun revolves this vast machine,
Though to his eye its mass a point appears:
Ador’d the God that whirls surrounding spheres,
Which first ordain’d that mighty Sol should reign
The peerless monarch of th’ ethereal train:
Of miles twice forty millions is his height,
And yet his radiance dazzles mortal sight
So far beneath–from him th’ extended earth
Vigour derives, and ev’ry flow’ry birth:
Vast through her orb she moves with easy grace
Around her Phoebus in unbounded space;
True to her course th’ impetuous storm derides,
Triumphant o’er the winds, and surging tides.
Almighty, in these wond’rous works of thine,
What Pow’r, what Wisdom, and what Goodness shine!
And are thy wonders, Lord, by men explor’d,
And yet creating glory unador’d!
Creation smiles in various beauty gay,
While day to night, and night succeeds to day:
That Wisdom, which attends Jehovah’s ways,
Shines most conspicuous in the solar rays:
Without them, destitute of heat and light,
This world would be the reign of endless night:
In their excess how would our race complain,
Abhorring life! how hate its length’ned chain!
From air adust what num’rous ills would rise?
What dire contagion taint the burning skies?
What pestilential vapours, fraught with death,
Would rise, and overspread the lands beneath?
Hail, smiling morn, that from the orient main
Ascending dost adorn the heav’nly plain!
So rich, so various are thy beauteous dies,
That spread through all the circuit of the skies,
That, full of thee, my soul in rapture soars,
And thy great God, the cause of all adores.
O’er beings infinite his love extends,
His Wisdom rules them, and his Pow’r defends.
When tasks diurnal tire the human frame,
The spirits faint, and dim the vital flame,
Then too that ever active bounty shines,
Which not infinity of space confines.
The sable veil, that Night in silence draws,
Conceals effects, but shows th’ Almighty Cause,
Night seals in sleep the wide creation fair,
And all is peaceful but the brow of care.
Again, gay Phoebus, as the day before,
Wakes ev’ry eye, but what shall wake no more;
Again the face of nature is renew’d,
Which still appears harmonious, fair, and good.
May grateful strains salute the smiling morn,
Before its beams the eastern hills adorn!
Shall day to day, and night to night conspire
To show the goodness of the Almighty Sire?
This mental voice shall man regardless hear,
And never, never raise the filial pray’r?
To-day, O hearken, nor your folly mourn
For time mispent, that never will return.
But see the sons of vegetation rise,
And spread their leafy banners to the skies.
All-wise Almighty Providence we trace
In trees, and plants, and all the flow’ry race;
As clear as in the nobler frame of man,
All lovely copies of the Maker’s plan.
The pow’r the same that forms a ray of light,
That call d creation from eternal night.
“Let there be light,” he said: from his profound
Old Chaos heard, and trembled at the sound:
Swift as the word, inspir’d by pow’r divine,
Behold the light around its Maker shine,
The first fair product of th’ omnific God,
And now through all his works diffus’d abroad.
As reason’s pow’rs by day our God disclose,
So we may trace him in the night’s repose:
Say what is sleep? and dreams how passing strange!
When action ceases, and ideas range
Licentious and unbounded o’er the plains,
Where Fancy’s queen in giddy triumph reigns.
Hear in soft strains the dreaming lover sigh
To a kind fair, or rave in jealousy;
On pleasure now, and now on vengeance bent,
The lab’ring passions struggle for a vent.
What pow’r, O man! thy reason then restores,
So long suspended in nocturnal hours?
What secret hand returns the mental train,
And gives improv’d thine active pow’rs again?
From thee, O man, what gratitude should rise!
And, when from balmy sleep thou op’st thine eyes,
Let thy first thoughts be praises to the skies.
How merciful our God who thus imparts
O’erflowing tides of joy to human hearts,
When wants and woes might be our righteous lot,
Our God forgetting, by our God forgot!
Among the mental pow’rs a question rose,
“What most the image of th’ Eternal shows?”
When thus to Reason (so let Fancy rove)
Her great companion spoke immortal Love.
“Say, mighty pow’r, how long shall strife prevail,
“And with its murmurs load the whisp’ring gale?
“Refer the cause to Recollection’s shrine,
“Who loud proclaims my origin divine,
“The cause whence heav’n and earth began to be,
“And is not man immortaliz’d by me?
“Reason let this most causeless strife subside.”
Thus Love pronounc’d, and Reason thus reply’d.
“Thy birth, coelestial queen! ’tis mine to own,
“In thee resplendent is the Godhead shown;
“Thy words persuade, my soul enraptur’d feels
“Resistless beauty which thy smile reveals.”
Ardent she spoke, and, kindling at her charms,
She clasp’d the blooming goddess in her arms.
Infinite Love where’er we turn our eyes
Appears: this ev’ry creature’s wants supplies;
This most is heard in Nature’s constant voice,
This makes the morn, and this the eve rejoice;
This bids the fost’ring rains and dews descend
To nourish all, to serve one gen’ral end,
The good of man: yet man ungrateful pays
But little homage, and but little praise.
To him, whose works arry’d with mercy shine,
What songs should rise, how constant, how divine!

Monument Tribute to Phillis Wheatley – 

The Phillis Wheatley monument is a part of the Boston’s Women’s Memorial. This memorial was established to honor important contributors to Boston’s rich and vibrant history. The sculpture is located between Fairfield Street and Gloucester Street on Commonwealth Avenue. Phillis Wheatley was chosen to be in this memorial because of her progressive ideas, commitment to social change and the impact of her legacy and writings. Her statue represents youth and imagination and is a fitting tribute to the first person of African descent to be publish a book of poetry in America and the third woman to do so in the American colonies. The book was entitled, “Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral”.

The statue is made out of bronze and granite and measures 59″ x 50″ x 32″. It was designed by sculptor Meredith Bergmann and installed and dedicated on October 25, 2003. Phillis Wheatley’s look was created from the only surviving image of the deceased poet. Meredith Bergmann used a new vision when it came to designing the Boston Women’s Memorial. Phillis Wheatley and the other subjects were not made in a “larger than life” manner. They are actually small enough for the public to intimately interact with them and instead of standing on a pedestal these sculptures are shown using them and displayed in poses that reflect the use and importance of language in their life.

On the monument you will find several inscriptions including a brief biography and her poem Imagination which reads as follows:

Imagination! who can sing thy force?
Or who describe the swiftness of thy course?
Soaring through air to find the bright abode,
Th’ empyreal palace of the thund’ring God,
We on thy pinions can surpass the wind,
And leave the rolling universe behind:
From star to star the mental optics rove,
Measure the skies, and range the realms above.
There in one view we grasp the mighty whole,
Or with new worlds amaze th’ unbounded soul.

 

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Monument Info and photo credit: https://www.blackartdepot.com/

Sly and the Family Stone: Hot Fun in the Summertime

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Photo Credit: Bing Images

I was only 6 years old when Sly and the Family Stone’s song “Hot Fun in the Summertime” was playing on the radio and burning up the charts. I can remember as I grew older, seeing my sisters, brother and their friends dancing, singing and enjoying the sounds of this band. This song will always bring back memories of my hot summers as a child growing up in a small Texas town. You can really appreciate the strong vocals of each member as they showcase their talents. The song opens with Sly on the piano showcasing his incredible playing skills. The song was written by Sly Stone who was not only a singer, but songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist.

Hot Fun in the Summertime was released in 1969 in the wake of the band’s high-profile performance at Woodstock, which greatly expanded their fanbase. The song peaked at number 2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart, kept out of the number 1 spot by I Can’t Get Next to You by The Temptations. “Hot Fun in the Summertime” also peaked at number 3 on the U.S. Billboard soul singles chart in autumn 1969. It is ranked as the seventh biggest U.S. hit of 1969, and the 65th in Canada.
Rolling Stone ranked the song #247 on their list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time,” and it has also been named in lists by Yahoo! Music and AskMen as an all-time “summer anthem.”
Thematically, “Hot Fun in the Summertime” is a dedication to the fun and games to be had during the summer. “Hot Fun in the Summertime” was intended to be included on an in-progress album with “Everybody Is a Star” and “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Aging),” the LP was never completed, and the three tracks were instead included on the band’s 1970 Greatest Hits LP. This song is known for its rare use of strings in a Sly and the Family Stone song, featuring violins being played in the upper register.

The B-side to this single is “Fun,” a song taken from the group’s third album (Life) from 1968.

The Beach Boys also covered this song on their 1992 album Summer in Paradise. The song was also released as a single during that same year, backed with “Summer of Love.” A video was made to accompany the song.

Song Lyrics

End of the spring and here she comes back
Hi, hi, hi, hi there
Them summer days, those summer days

That’s when I had most of my fun back
High, high, high, high there
Them summer days, those summer days

I ‘Cloud nine’ when I want to
Out of school, yeah
County fair in the country sun
And everything, it’s true, ooh, yeah, yeah

Hot fun in the summertime
Hot fun in the summertime
Hot fun in the summertime
Hot fun in the summertime

First of the fall and then she goes back
Bye, bye, bye, bye there
Them summer days, those summer days

‘Boop-boop-ba-boop-boop’ when I want to
Out of school
County fair in the country sun
And everything, it’s cool, ooh, yeah

Hot fun in the summertime
Hot fun in the summertime
Hot fun in the summertime

Remaining Positive in a Negative World!

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In an ever-changing world filled with such negative news, people, relationships, politics and demanding jobs; it’s easy for people to become more and more depressed. Our thoughts become words, our words become action and if all we do is think negative thoughts, our actions will have negative consequences.

Often, we need to sit back and put our own lives into perspective. Negative energy can wear a person down, physically, spiritually, emotionally & mentally. If we are in the company of negative people daily, it doesn’t help because their energy drains and wears on each person who is trying to remain strong and positive. When you work for a large corporation and are in contact with people all through the day 5 days a week, 8 to 9 hours a day, it can be rough listening to the negativity and actions of others. Negativity is like a poison; it enters the body and breaks down the positive walls we’ve worked hard building for ourselves. It eats away at our sanity as well as our relationships. We should align ourselves with positive people; those who are strong and love lifting their friends up with positivity, those of whom aren’t self-centered and can compliment others on their achievements and accept compliments as well. “Birds of a feather flock together,’ is a phrase I’ve heard for years. It’s true, and therefore if we want to remain positive, do our best to align ourselves with positive people and bring our positive energy to the table as well.

Meditation, exercising, listing to music, reading good books, eating healthy and drinking plenty of water will assist us with our journey to remaining positive. I have found that listening to the sound of waterfalls, rain and nature videos have helped me when I am feeling a little stressed. I also love fishing and being out in nature, which is a great way to get away from negativity.

“Sometimes we must Boldly remove all people, places and things from your life that do not add to our growth!”

“ODD GIRL OUT!”

Tear-Drops-Girls

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While sitting in the school cafeteria eating lunch all alone;

The laughter around her grows louder.

The girls at the next table stare harder;

Eye contact becomes too much to bear.

Whispering to one another as they give her the smirk grin;

as they lower their eyebrows as a sign of dominance.

As one mean girl leaves the table to go whisper into the

Ear of a boy sitting at another table.

At that moment, the boy begins to laugh;

while whispering to the other guys at his table.

They all laugh and look over at the girl sitting alone.

At that moment the fight or flight feeling sets in and she must leave.

She must get out of the cafeteria and find a safe place.

There is no safe place when you’re the “Odd Girl Out!”

Her heart beating faster & faster, feels as though it will jump out of her chest.

Why is there such joy & laughter behind the dark mistreatment of another?

What is it about the girl who’s become the chosen one?

Why must she be subjected to harassment & bullying?

Why does that make the bully feel dominant, free and in control?

Is the self-esteem of her peers so low, that they demand some sort of abnormal attention?

They are all old enough to know that this cowardly act is not a game!

What runs through the minds of those who bully others?

Such behavior is often too incomprehensible to imagine;

For the school, parents and especially for the Odd Girl Out!

JASMINE D. PARKER ©

Who’s Ready for Fall?

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On the hottest days of summer, it feels great to relax with a good book, ice cold glass of water, lemonade or tea, or whatever your beverage of preference may be. Summertime is a great time to spend with family and friends, having a cook outs, swimming, camping, fishing or just hanging out and having fun!

I hope each and everyone of you are having a great summer and playing safe as you enjoy your time off from work, and every single minute with your family & friends!

For many people, hanging out in the sun is something they wait all year to do; and the hotter, the better.  For many others, such as myself, we long for Fall & Winter, but have as much fun during the summer months as the temperature will allow.  We all know that natural sunlight is the best source of Vitamin D; but when you can’t tolerate much of the sun and it’s beautiful but scorching rays, it makes it difficult to enjoy too many hours out doors.  The Dog Days of Summer are upon us right now, and for those of us who are hot natured, we truly feel it!

The Dog Days – 

The Dog days, a name for the most sultry period of summer, from about July 3rd to August 11th. Named in early times by observers in countries bordering the Mediterranean, the period was reckoned as extending from 20 days before to 20 days after the conjunction of Sirius (the dog star) and the sun. In the latitude of the Mediterranean region, this period coincided with hot days that were plagued with disease and discomfort. The time of conjunction varies with difference in latitude, and because of the precession of the equinoxes it changes gradually over long periods in all latitudes.

Due to a very slow wobble of Earth’s axis, the Dog Star now seems to rise later than it did in ancient times. Its ascension no longer coincides with the start of the Nile flood (which does not occur anyway, because the river is now controlled by the Aswan Dam), but Sirius still makes its appearance during hot summer days.

Old-timers believed that rainfall on the dog days was a bad omen, as foretold in this verse:
Dog Days bright and clear
Indicate a happy year;
But when accompanied by rain,
For better times, our hopes are vain.

Dog Days are approaching; you must, therefore, make both hay and haste while the Sun shines, for when old Sirius takes command of the weather, he is such an unsteady, crazy dog, there is no dependence upon him.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac, 1817

STAY HYDRATED MY FRIENDS!

 

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