The Supremes – I’m Living In Shame!

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I have always been a huge fan of Diana Ross and the Supremes.  My sisters had all their music and I remember hearing their songs played on the record player and my sisters and their friends doing the dances of that time. There was the Mashed Potato, the Chicken Scratch, the Twist, etc. I placed this song on my list of sad songs not too long ago.  The song is actually inspired by the plot of Douglas Sirk’s 1959 film Imitation of Life.” It’s hard to listen to this song and not cry. I love my mother with all my heart and can’t even imagine the thought of anyone being ashamed of their mother.

“I’m Livin’ in Shame” is a 1969 song released for Diana Ross & the Supremes on the Motown label. The sequel to the Supremes’ number-one hit, “Love Child,” the song peaked in the top ten on the US Billboard Hot 100 pop chart at #10 and the top 20 in the UK at #14 in April and May 1969. This song was actually placed in the Psychedelic pop, Psychedelic soul genre.

Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Livin%27_in_Shame

SONG LYRICS – 

Mom was cooking bread
She wore a dirty raggety scarf around her head
Always had her stockings low
Rolled to her feet, she just didn’t know
She wore a sloppy dress
Oh no matter how she tried, she always looked a mess
Out of the pot she ate, never used a fork or a dinner plate
I was always so ashamed for my uptown friends to see her
Afraid one day when I was grown that I would be her

In a college town, away from home, a new identity I found
Said I was born elite, with maids and servants at my feet
I must have been insane
I lied and said my mom died on a weekend trip to Spain
She never got out of the house, never even boarded a train
I married a guy, was livin’ high
I didn’t want him to know her
She had a grandson, two years old
I never even showed her

I’m livin’ in shame, Momma, I miss you
I know you are not to blame, Momma, I miss you

Came the telegram
Mom passed away while making homemade jam
Before she died, she cried to see me by her side
She always did her best, ah! cookin’, cleanin’
Always in the same old dress
Workin’ hard down on her knees
Always try’n to please
Momma! Momma! Momma, do you hear me
Momma! Momma! Momma, do you hear me

I’m livin’ in shame, Momma, I miss you
I know you’ve done your best
Momma, I miss you
Won’t you forgive me Momma
For all the wrong I’ve done
I know you have done your best
I know you have done your very best you could
But I never understood
Workin’ hard on your knees
Momma, you were always, always tryin’ to please

 

Songwriters: BERRY GORDY JR, BERRY JR GORDY, FRANK EDWARD WILSON, HENRY COSBY, PAMELA JOAN SAWYER, R. DEAN TAYLOR
© Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Credit : LyricFind

 

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Arlo Guthrie – “The City of New Orleans!”

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While out running errands this morning, I happened to hear Arlo Guthrie on the 70s channel of SiriusXM Radio. I haven’t heard this song in quite some time. Honestly back when this song came out, I thought it to be a little sad as he referenced grave yards filled with old black men, and grave yards of the rusted automobiles. I could just imagine in my mind the view through his lyrics. It could leave one wondering what everything looked like and the images and thoughts that were going through the song writer, Steve Goodman’s head as he rode the train and took in the scenery. There were so many songs of that era that really touched me and left their mark upon my heart, and this is just one of them. Arlo’s voice almost reminds me of Bob Dylan; maybe it’s his story telling or just his expression in this song. I love the song and am so happy Steve Goodman wrote it and trusted Arlo Guthrie with it. Willie Nelson also covered this song and took it to #1 in 1984 on the Country Chart.

It’s touching to read how this song came to be and how Goodman wrote it as he traveled on the Illinois Central train. It just tugs at your heart and digs down deep into your soul!

SONG FACTS:

Arlo Guthrie is a prolific songwriter (and the son of maybe the more prolific songwriters), but he didn’t write this one. “City Of New Orleans” was composed by the Chicago singer-songwriter Steve Goodman in 1970.

Goodman wrote the lyrics on a sketch pad after his wife fell asleep on the Illinois Central train, where they were going to visit his wife’s grandmother. Goodman wrote about what he saw looking out the windows of the train and playing cards in the club car. Everything in the song actually happened on the ride.

After he returned home, Goodman heard that the train was scheduled to be decommissioned due to lack of passengers. He was encouraged to use this song to save the train, so he retouched the lyrics and released it on his first album in 1971.
Steve Goodman released his version as a single in 1972, but it was Arlo Guthrie’s cover that same year that popularized the song and brought attention to rail lines that were vanishing across middle America. Many people who lived in rural areas relied on them to travel.

Steve Goodman died on September 20, 1984 at the age of 36 after a long battle with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. That same year, Willie Nelson covered this song and made it the title track of his album. Nelson’s version was a #1 Country hit and won the Grammy Award for Best Country Song, which is a songwriting category and thus an honor bestowed posthumously to Goodman.

Nelson was one of many high-profile fans of Goodman, who released 11 albums in his lifetime. Diagnosed with leukemia in 1969, Goodman underwent chemotherapy and his cancer stayed in remission for 13 years thanks to an unpleasant regimen of drugs and treatment. When his cancer returned, Goodman continued performing and stayed in high spirits. This song, written after he was diagnosed, is a great example of his positive outlook, demonstrating a mindfulness and vitality of someone who appreciates the time he has left.

Credit: https://www.songfacts.com/facts/arlo-guthrie/city-of-new-orleans

SONG LYRICS –

“City Of New Orleans”

Riding on the City of New Orleans
Illinois Central, Monday morning rail
15 cars and 15 restless riders
3 conductors, 25 sacks of mailAll along the southbound odyssey, the train pulls out of Kankakee
And rolls along past houses farms and fields
Passing trains that have no name, and freight yards full of old black men
And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles

Good morning America, how are you
Said don’t you know me, I’m your native son
I’m the train they call the City of New Orleans
I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done

Dealing card games, with the old men in the club car
Penny a point ain’t no one keeping score
Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
Feel the wheels, rumblin’ ‘neath the floor

And the sons of Pullman porters, and the sons of engineers
Ride their fathers’ magic carpets, made of steel
And mothers with their babes asleep, are rockin’ to the gentle beat
And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel

Good morning America, how are you
Said don’t you know me, I’m your native son
I’m the train they call the City of New Orleans
I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done

Nighttime on the City of New Orleans
Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee
Halfway home, we’ll be there by morning
Through the Mississippi darkness, rolling down to the sea

But all the towns and people seem, to fade into a bad dream
And the steel rail still ain’t heard the news
The conductor sings his songs again, the passengers will please refrain
This train got the disappearing railroad blues

Good night America, how are you
Said don’t you know me, I’m your native son
I’m the train they call the City of New Orleans
I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done

Written by: Steve Goodman – https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/arloguthrie/cityofneworleans.html

EZRA POUND – POETS WHO INSPIRE!

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Here’s a poet and critic of the twentieth century that walked to a beat of his own drum.

Although controversial, but still standing for what he believed in at a time when you were shunned and out casted for being different or having your own ideas that didn’t coincide with the ideas of the majority.

Of all the major literary figures in the twentieth century, Ezra Pound has been one of the most controversial; he has also been one of modern poetry’s most important contributors. Pound authored more than 70 books and promoted many other now-famous writers, including James Joyce and T.S. Eliot.

 

BIOGRAPHY –

Poet Ezra Pound was born on October 30, 1885, in Hailey, Idaho. He studied literature and languages in college and in 1908 left for Europe, where he published several successful books of poetry. Pound advanced a “modern” movement in English and American literature. His pro-Fascist broadcasts in Italy during World War II led to his arrest and confinement until 1958.

EARLY YEARS –

One of the 20th century’s most influential voices in American and English literature, Ezra Pound was born in the small mining town of Hailey, Idaho, on October 30, 1885. The only child of Homer Loomis Pound, a Federal Land Office official, and his wife, Isabel, Ezra spent the bulk of his childhood just outside Philadelphia, where his father had moved the family after accepting a job with the U.S. Mint. His childhood seems to have been a happy one. He eventually attended Cheltenham Military Academy, staying there two years before leaving to finish his high school education at a local public school.

In 1901, Pound enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania, but left after two years and transferred to Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy. By this time, Pound knew full well that he wanted to be a poet. At the age of 15, he had told his parents as much. Though his chosen vocation certainly wasn’t something he had inherited directly from his more conventional mother and father, Homer and Isabel were supportive of their son’s choice.

In 1907, after finishing college, Pound accepted a teaching job at Indiana’s Wabash College. But the fit between the artistic, somewhat bohemian poet and the formal institution was less than perfect, and Pound soon left.

His next move proved to be more daring. In 1908, with just $80 in his pocket, he set sail for Europe, and landed in Venice brimming with confidence that he would soon make a name for himself in the world of poetry. With his own money, Pound paid for the publication of his first book of poems, “A Lume Spento.”

If you would like to read more on the extraordinary man, please visit: https://www.biography.com/writer/ezra-pound

A Girl –

The tree has entered my hands,
The sap has ascended my arms,
The tree has grown in my breast –
Downward,
The branches grow out of me, like arms.

Tree you are,
Moss you are,
You are violets with wind above them.
A child – so high – you are,
And all this is folly to the world.

A Pact –

I make a pact with you, Walt Whitman –
I have detested you long enough.
I come to you as a grown child
Who has had a pig-headed father;
I am old enough now to make friends.
It was you that broke the new wood,
Now is a time for carving.
We have one sap and one root –
Let there be commerce between us.

An Immorality –

Sing we for love and idleness,
Naught else is worth the having.

Though I have been in many a land,
There is naught else in living.

And I would rather have my sweet,
Though rose-leaves die of grieving,

Than do high deeds in Hungary
To pass all men’s believing.

ALICE WALKER – POETS WHO INSPIRE!

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As an avid reader and writer, I love reading and researching about other writers I know little or nothing at all about.  Many of these people have lived incredible lives and others have had nothing but made something great out of the nothing.  Well, I know who the great Alice Walker is, but have never just sat down and read up about her.  I do know she is the author of the book, “The Color Purple,” which was made into one of my favorite movies. Having been born in Georgia back in the 40s, I am sure she saw a lot and experienced a lot, good and not so good.  Ms. Walker put her energy into going to college and making something amazing out of herself. She along with so many of the other writers out there have inspired many, and as I continue reading about these writers, it encourages me to write on!

BIOGRAPHY – 

Alice Walker was born on February 9, 1944, in Eatonton, Georgia, the eighth and last child of Willie Lee and Minnie Lou Grant Walker, who were sharecroppers. When Alice Walker was eight years old, she lost sight of one eye when one of her older brothers shot her with a BB gun by accident. In high school, Alice Walker was valedictorian of her class, and that achievement, coupled with a “rehabilitation scholarship” made it possible for her to go to Spelman, a college for black women in Atlanta, Georgia. After spending two years at Spelman, she transferred to Sarah Lawrence College in New York, and during her junior year traveled to Africa as an exchange student. She received her bachelor of arts degree from Sarah Lawrence College in 1965.

After finishing college, Walker lived for a short time in New York, then from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, she lived in Tougaloo, Mississippi, during which time she had a daughter, Rebecca, in 1969. Alice Walker was active in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and in the 1990’s she is still an involved activist. She has spoken for the women’s movement, the anti-apartheid movement, for the anti-nuclear movement, and against female genital mutilation. Alice Walker started her own publishing company, Wild Trees Press, in 1984. She currently resides in Northern California with her dog, Marley.
She received the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 for “The Color Purple.” Among her numerous awards and honors are the Lillian Smith Award from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rosenthal Award from the National Institute of Arts & Letters, a nomination for the National Book Award, a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship, a Merrill Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Front Page Award for Best Magazine Criticism from the Newswoman’s Club of New York. She also has received the Townsend Prize and a Lyndhurst Prize.

Before you knew you owned it –

Expect nothing. Live frugally
On surprise.
become a stranger
To need of pity
Or, if compassion be freely
Given out
Take only enough
Stop short of urge to plead
Then purge away the need.

Wish for nothing larger
Than your own small heart
Or greater than a star;
Tame wild disappointment
With caress unmoved and cold
Make of it a parka
For your soul.

Discover the reason why
So tiny human midget
Exists at all
So scared unwise
But expect nothing. Live frugally
On surprise.

Biography and poem credit: http://www.famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/alice_walker/poems

DANTE – Child Poets Who Inspire!

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I am always excited to read about poets.  It doesn’t matter if they are young or old. Poetry inspires me and I get lost in reading it.  It’s a way of being in a peaceful, stress-free place.
May I introduce to you, Dante. He started writing poetry this year in fifth grade and has been very enthusiastic. His teacher says she has never seen a student write so much poetry and has even read some of Dante’s poems to her children. Dante lives in the USA and is 10 years old.

Day and Night –

In the day you’ll wave goodbye run around and fly a kite.
But when the day comes to an end sleep is what you must attend.
Climb in your bed and fluff your pillow take one last look out the window.
Ask yourself one more question…

Why does the sun go up and down shine and darken every town?
Let’s not worry about that right now but I know you’ll find out.
Night to dawn to light to dusk yep that’s right nothing wrong.

Poem Credit: https://www.loriswebs.com/youngpoets/dante.html

Dandelions – The Incredible Edible Flower!

dandelion flower

Photo Credit: www.ediblewildfood.com

Gardeners have cursed the dandelion and its pervasive nature. They pop up everywhere in spring and are so hard to get rid of.
Having grown up in a small West Texas town, I am no stranger to the Dandelion; although we pulled them up with our gloved hands or chopped them down with the hoe. We had no idea what we were missing out on and clumped this healthy plant into the weed family.
To be perfectly honest, I always thought they were poisonous. I guess it was because of the white milky sap that oozed from the stems. When I first started reading up on edible plants, I just couldn’t believe Dandelions were on the list. I’m excited about all of the health benefits associated with eating this plant and can’t wait to give it a try!

  • The Normans called this plant “dent de lion”—tooth of the lion—for its jagged leaves. Anglo-Saxons corrupted this name into dandylion.
  • The Vikings brought dandelion seed with them to Iceland and Greenland where the plant still thrives today.
  • The Chinese call it “nail in the earth” for its long taproot which draws nutrients and moisture from deep in the ground.
  • In medieval times, dandelions gathered on St. John’s Eve—June 24—were believed to repel witches. The milky sap, given the name “devil’s milk pail”, was used to cure warts and pimples.

DANDELION HEALTH BENEFITS

Seeds were brought here by the Puritans to plant in their herb gardens and the plants soon escaped, making their way across the country. Since all parts of the plant are edible and rich in vitamins, that is not a bad thing.

  • Dandelions are more nutritious than spinach, have 25 times the vitamin A of tomato juice, and are a good source of calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, lecithin, and vitamins C, B, and E. For many early settlers, dandelions made a life-saving spring tonic.
  • The dandelion was a standard medicinal plant used by herbalists for generations. Their Latin name—Taraxacum officinale—means a remedy for disorders. The leaves are a powerful diuretic but since they do not flush potassium from the body they are safer than pharmaceutical diuretics. The roots are slightly laxative and a tea made from ground fresh or dried roots is reported to improve digestion.
  • Similar to their cousin chicory, the roots can be roasted until they are dark brown inside and out, ground into a powder, and used as a coffee substitute.
For more health benefits and also recipes, please visit: https://www.almanac.com/news/gardening/garden-journal/dandelion-health-benefits

dandelion drawing

Photo Credit: www.ediblewildfood.com

Imogen Kate Hindson – Inspiring Child Poets!

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I Love My Brother –

My brother is sweet,
My brother is nice,

When I am upset,
I come for advice.

He teaches me new stuff
Almost all the time,

And I think that
Is really, really kind.

I love my brother,
And he loves me.

Now that’s the way
It’s meant to be.

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/i-love-my-brother

Michaela George – Child Poets!

 

Here is another talented child writer. Her name is Michaela George, and she’s 12 years old. Michaela enjoys writing songs, stories, and poems. Isn’t it fascinating to find so many children writing such outstanding poetry at such a young age? I find it just incredible and love seeing children diving into good books, putting on their creative thinking cap and creating poetry for all to enjoy.
Please sit back and enjoy this beautiful poem written by Michaela George!

SEASONS –

Winter is cold, with gusts of tumbling snow,
When rain falls down and nothing ever grows.
For children, it’s the snow that they desire
And cups of cocoa in front of the fire.

When winter’s gone, the grass grows green again.
Roses and tulips sprout with bright green stems.
The bees are buzzing, the birds are singing.
Sheep are grazing and cow bells are ringing.

And then the sun starts to shine too brightly.
It’s so hot that fans are put on nightly,
And so then it’s off to the beach or pools
Where people swim about just to keep cool.

All the leaves on the trees turn golden-brown,
And when on the ground make a crackly sound.
In autumn a lot of money you make
From clearing backyards of leaves with a rake.

Each season has its own goods and its bads,
But since they are all different I am glad!

Credit: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/seasons-2

Ahmad J. Bell aka, “VICTORIOUS!” – People Who Inspire Others!

There are many people out there who believe the music industry has gone too far with adding to their genres, Hip Hop Gospel. Look around you, there’s a new generation and new wave of musicians out there who are making a difference in the lives of many others. Hip Hop has stood the test of time and has truly evolved into something special and most creative. Young men and women of this day and age now have a genre of music that they can relate to and can also speak to them in a way that the Gospel and Christian music of our day spoke to us!

Victorious will go a long way and still be around when many have thrown the torch down. This incredible artist will and already has touched the lives, souls and inner spirit of many Christians and non-Christians as well. He has truly given people something to think about!

Please allow me to introduce you to Ahmad J. Bell (aka) “Victorious!”

“Victorious!”

Ahmad J. Bell” (AKA…Victorious ) is an American Public speaker, youth mentor, content provider, Recording Artist, Concert Organizer/Promoter and Motivational Speaker. Having had success in the secular music industry he was called into relationship with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. After his life change, Victorious took a year off from music to have a ready response to what he believed and become solid in his faith walk, sewing his time focusing on the newfound relationship with Jesus Christ. Heeding his Pastors instructions he stood up and began to share the gospel through Christian Hip Hop and become a force in regional and national ministry platforms as a solo artist, member of The Warriors ATX and as local DJ at Candle 88.1 KNLE a show called the flipside.

As a member of “The Warriors ATX,” he won several Holy Hip Awards from THHHA (Texas Holy Hip Hop Awards) and was honored by the TGAG (Texas Gospel Announcers Guild) for Perseverance inside of the genre. His commitment to spreading the gospel has opened new doors such as taking over the SXSW CHH portion in 2011 and Renaming it the Kingdom Experience. Showcasing Major Gospel Artists, Christian Hip Hop artist and Christian Contemporary/ Rock as well. Victorious has appeared on over 35 albums and 4 mixtapes. With the Warriors ATX he released 3 full length albums. As a solo artist he has released 3 solo records. He has also toured and ministered alongside of artist such as, Lecrae, Tedashii, Trip Lee, Bizzle, THISL, Bryan Trejo, Flame, Da T.R.U.T.H., Canton Jones, VRose, The Walls Group, Kirk Franklin, Jonathan McReynolds, JJ Hairston, 5ive, RAW and many more. “None of my accomplishments mean anything if I am not pointing back to the cross!” said Victorious “Purpose is the ONLY reason for holding the microphone and standing on stage.” Also Victorious is an Ordained Deacon at Agape Christian Ministries for 11 years and has been a member of Agape for 20 years, where his leader is Bishop Lawrence A. Wilkerson. In 2018 Victorious released his newest project on Potiphars House. The label ran and operated Craig James (5ive.) His sophomore release on the label is slotted for early 2019 entitled #wearevictorious.”

Credit: https://www.iamvictorious.net

To sample some of the music or make a purchase, please visit: https://music.apple.com/us/album/we-are-victorious-w-a-v/1476688146.

Album available on 9/05/2019 on all music platforms!

Poems Written by Children –

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It’s always wonderful to see children take interest in reading & writing.

This extraordinary little fella has some of the most amazing poems.
His name is Vivian and he has been writing since he was 5 years old.
He loves poems with emotion. Vivian lives in India. I hope you all enjoy

each poem as I did. I sure hope this little boy keeps writing and giving

the world something happy to look forward to.

The Dog who sat on a Log

There was a dog, who sat on a log
And with him, were a lot of frogs,
Along came a noisy hen, with a head bend
“Hello, Hello Can we be friends?”
“No thank you “growled the dog
The noisy hen jumped off the log.
Then came a naughty duck
who liked pecking other ducks.
“Can you play with me?” she quacked
“Not with naughty ducks” he barked.
Along came sad Sam the shepherd boy
who sat on the log, with an old toy.
The old dog lifted his head and woofed,
“Bruno!! Where were you all these years?”
Shouted back overjoyed Sam.
Once loved, never lost!
by Vivian age 7
Copyright © June 14th, 2012

Icy Winter

Icy winter everywhere
Up on the hills
Cool as a breeze
Snowballs to throw
Snowman to make

Artic or Antartic
North or South
Icy winter you are there
Cold as an ice-cream
That I would love to hold

White as the clouds
Pure as Silver
Cotton spread through
And fallen on trees
Icy winter snow is here

Deep in the valley
Draping the mount sides
You fall on me
Reminding me every time
Icy winter you are mine.

by Vivian
Copyright © Sept. 25th, 2012

A Chicken named Licken

Once I had a chicken
Whose name was Licken
But it named itself Richen
I thought he was small,
But he pulled my shawl
And had a real bad fall
. One day I saw a cock
It snatched away my clock.
I got angry and threw a rock.
Then it scratched its head
And went limping to bed
With a leg that was red.
I felt quite sad
My dad said it was bad
This made me feel mad.
Then I took my chicken
Which was named Licken
And decided to call it Ricken
I took the cock
And gave it my only clock.

by Vivian
Copyright © Oct. 17th, 2012

Written in a restaurant on Oct 17th 2012
When Vivian saw how the chicken was hurt,
he decided to give away his clock and
call the chicken the name he likes.

Poems Credit: https://www.loriswebs.com/youngpoets/